Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops ...

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Do bitcoin miner hashrates convert 1:1 with peercoin mining

Hi Guys,
I'm thinking of buying an ant miner off Amazon but I'm new to all of this and I'm curious if the rated 180gh/s hash rate mean it will mine peercoins at the same rate?
submitted by reakos to peercoin [link] [comments]

[HASH RATE] Where's solid evidence that bitcoin's hashrate of 140 EH/s is much more than a group of miners could achieve?

What's the average amount of hash operations a supercomputer could do? Or an ASIC mining thing?
And how do we know bitcoin's current hash rate is large enough that it would be way more expensive to buy all that equipment and do a 51% attack?
submitted by marcelo10fr1 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Miners Push Hashrate to New All-Time High of 144 EH/s

Bitcoin Miners Push Hashrate to New All-Time High of 144 EH/s submitted by bitdex to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Security of network

I was wondering, given a standard "bitcoin miner hashrate" whatever is the minimum hash for entry at the moment into the bitcoin market - compared to the size of the hashrate - how much smaller in comparison is vertcoin's mining - considering its 330gh/s but some GPUs only do 500kh/s
submitted by darrenturn90 to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars submitted by bitcointothemoon_ to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition submitted by JonyRotten to btc [link] [comments]

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars submitted by bitcointothemoon_ to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars submitted by bitcointothemoon_ to Crypto_Currency_News [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Ramps to 130 Exahash Amid Next-Generation Miner Shortage

submitted by raaner12 to Altcoinss [link] [comments]

Bitcoin miners hebben vertrouwen in de toekomst, hashrate flink in de lift

Bitcoin miners hebben vertrouwen in de toekomst, hashrate flink in de lift submitted by moneyshouters to u/moneyshouters [link] [comments]

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars

Cold Shower For Sweating Bitcoin Miners in Sight as Hashrate Soars submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Ramps to 130 Exahash Amid Next-Generation Miner Shortage

Bitcoin Hashrate Ramps to 130 Exahash Amid Next-Generation Miner Shortage submitted by none7987 to Bitcointe [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Ramps to 130 Exahash Amid Next-Generation Miner Shortage (current BTC/USD price is $10,574.52)

Latest Bitcoin News:
Bitcoin Hashrate Ramps to 130 Exahash Amid Next-Generation Miner Shortage
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Bitcoin Mining | Blockchain
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Cash network at risk as miners flee the scene and hashrate collapses

Bitcoin Cash network at risk as miners flee the scene and hashrate collapses submitted by paulemmanuelng to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Potential Information

Potential Information
I'm going to try and demonsrate, in Natural Language, why there is a Revolution occuring in Information Science. The question I wish to Address is: "How much Information is there in a give Container?". As modern Computer Scientists see things, the amount of Information in a given container is precisely the number of possible discrete states of that conainer. So a nibble can be in 16 possibles states, a byte can be in 256 possible states, and so on. I'd to coin the term "Potential Information" and make an explicit Parallel with Potential Energy. So for a byte, the Potential Information is 256. It's interesting that we don't use Units for Potential Information, though it is a well studied concept, if newly named. Conctpetually, we understand the Units as 256 pieces of "Potential Discrete Information", so let us use name the Units pdi.
Let's extend the Parallel with Potential Energy. A Boulder at the Top of a Mountain is said to have a Potential Energy Relative to it's height, weight and the Gravitational Constant that is tranfered to Kinetic Energy if it Rolls down the Mountain. For Argument's sake let us Suppose a Flat Earth, then at the Bottom of the Mountain, the Boulder is said to have Zero Potential Energy (certinaly regarding its Potential to fall under Gravity but but I expect there are other ways Squeeze Enery out of Rock!). In a Computer I would say that a byte in a Switch On Computer is like the Boulder at the top of the Mountain with Maximum Potential Information (256pdi) and in a Switch of Computer, it has Minimum Potential Information.
So here's a Question first of all: "What is Minimum Potential Information?". Let's now do a thought experiment to help aswer the question at hand. Consider the concept of a "Broken Bit"; a bit that is fixed in either the 0 or 1 state and can't be changed. So, Information Theorists? What is the pdi of a Broken Bit? We now a working bit has 2pdi, but do we say the Broken Bit has 1pdi or 0pdi? 1pdi seems reasonable because it has a single Discrete State, but then 0pdi it seems we can't draw any information from it. If 0 is your answer, then I think you've jumped the gun, becuase I never told you what state it was locked in. What if I tell you it is locked in the 1 state? Well certainly we can draw no further information from it, but I say we still have the information that it is in the 1 state. So, I would say that before observation, the bit has 1pdi, but after observation, it has 0 pdi.
Now let us consider another possible unit of Information Measure "Discrete Information" or "di". So what is the di of a Broken Bit? Before we Observe it, we know we are going to read 1 Discrete Piece of information, and afterwards, we have read 1 Discrete Piece of Information. So I would say that the di of a Broken Bit is 1 in any Eventuality.
So you could interpret that as meaning that pdi is Time dependent and di is not Time dependent, which is a reasonable way to look at it. A more precise Way to look at it from a Computer Scientists point of view woud be to say that pdi is dependent on the number of "Reads" or "Potential Reads" where as di is not. This certainly holds for the Broken Bit. But, let us consider a working bit.
Let's get side tracked a bit and analyze a couple of common Computer Science Abstracts: Programs and Operations. Here's a suggestion for the definition of a "Program": A "Program" be an initial value for a container, and a series of well defined operations that manipulate the information of the container.
But this begs the question, what is an Operation... actually there's no obvious answer, it is thought of differently at different levels of the Computer Stack. To a user, Typing in a url and hitting Enter might be thought of as an Operation. The Web-Browser Software Developer, might consider an Operation to flag that the user has clicked in the url bar, an operation to read the string, operation(s) to analyis it, and operation(s) to send it to the DNS server. How about the guy who programmed the "String Read" operation, perhaps Scanf in C. That probably entails rather a few operations in Software alone, though it is a single operation in C. Then how many operations in Hardware were performed in this situation?
Here's a good Analogy for this type of thinking that any programmer will understand. Imagine you meansure Operations number of function calls. So how many operations in a "hello world application"? Well in C, it's One function call (not including main). Ok, but what about in Assembler? Rather a many function calls I would think. Then how did it get on your screen? Imagine the vast quatities of Function Calls that translate printf("hello world"); into a pattern of illuminated LEDs on the screen in a Terminal Window. Beyond that, how about the vast Edifices of Abstractions that lead to these LEDs glowing? Pixels, resolution, then colour of pixel which is represented as four bytes and needs Computer Software to interpret, then convert into a format correct to the monitor, then the monitor probably has more software to apply any colour correction and convert it into an Electrical Charge through some sort of Digital to Analog Converster that will eventually make a pixel glow with a certain colour. So how many operations in a "hello world" program? One could probably write countless Volumes analysing every operation that takes place from the flow of electrons through through Logic Gates, in the CPU, through the interupt mechanism on the chip to read you keystrokes, the abtraction of a bit and the operations of each ALU, the interpretation of the bits at each state of the ALUs computation etc. In fact, I think if you fully Analysed Everything that takes place inside a Computer in writing, compiling and executing a simple "hello world" program on a modern computer, you could probably chart pretty much the entire History of Computer Science.
For a moment, let us consider programs with no inputs, and et me suggest a definition of an Operation that may seem a little left field: "A Single Operation is the Space between two outputs", and "an output is any piece of information that it is a requirement that the program produce to satisfy its operation to the user". Let us assume for a moment that the only output device for a program is a Screen, and we a running a tech demo of the latest video game. As far as the user (i.e. viewer) is concerned, the only output they need is each frame. So long as the frame rate ticks over, the user is happy regardless of what is going on inside the computer. Then, the rate of Operations is Solely Dependent on how often the Screen updates, and 1 Operation takes place in the Computer inbetween each frame under this definition. So why use this seemingly bizarre Abstraction? What I'm seeking is an Absolute Measure of Compute Speed or Proficiency, and it seems to me, it is dependent on the program that is running. I'm sure those ASCII chips for mining bitcoin are dyamite at mining bitcoin, but your not going to get world of Warcraft running on them. I'm not sure you can really compare the Compute Speed of a ASCII bitcoin mining Rig to an XBox to example, certainly not simply by measuring Clock Speed and memory access rates anyway. What would be considered an "output" for a bitcoin miner? Hashrate is the standard measure of a bitcoin miners speed, and it is a most beautifully simple and perfect measure. Considering Compute Speed as "Numer of Operations per Second", then my definition of Operations and Outputs gives the Hashrate on a bitcoin miner. What about when an output is a frame on a Screen? Then on a game tech demo, for example, the Compute Speed would be the frame rate using the definitions I have already give. Again, probably the best know measure of Compute Speed for that type of Software. So perhaps I beginning to hit on a good generaization. I've actually conned you a little bit... in fact, under this definition of an operation as the "space between" outputs, my measure of compute speed of a video game is actually framerate-1 and my bitcoin mining measure is Hashrate-1. Here's another interesting consequence, with framerate, if my Computer is outputing a 30 frames per second, then I am running at 29 operations per second, but if I am running at 59 operations per 2 seconds... Actually very important with this measure of speed, which I'll write about another time. Those that have been studying O-Cycles may well have just spotted a Parallel! I want to consider another type of program also. Some programs (and in my opinion usually wise ones) don't necessarilly seek to operate as fast as possible. Take "metronome" program for example and let an "output" be one metronome "click". If you just tried to run it as fast as possible, you would have hyper speed noisy and irregular metronome. i.e. not really a metronome at all. So what would satisfy the user in a metronome program? Ignoring issues of software design, the main anwer would be accuracy of timing; usually not directly proportional to compute speed. Let us coin a new phrase, "Compute Proficiency" and say that for a metronome, Compute Proficiecy is measured by the accuracy of the metronome's timing. So Compute proficiency could be measured the deviation of the click, from some standar norm. i.e. deviation (perhaps in milliseconds) away from some target timing. Now, in my experience as a skilled bedroom music producer and Computer Scientist, this has precisely no relationship to the clock speed of any electronic/computer musical intrument I use. Consider measuring time in Beats and consider the Cartesian Plane with Time Measured on the x axis and Time Modulus 1 on the y axis. Then the beats will be series of points with y = around the line y = 0. Then we can do all sorts of Statistics to Measure Compute Profiency based on each point's deviation from (0, n) where n is an Integer...
[...a brief digression for those that have been following my other work, if we map the timing of each beat to the Complex Plane as follows: y = time and x = (time modulus 1) + 1/2, then let c = x + yi, then we have a rather recognizable line through the Complex Plane. For a Perfectly accurate Metronome, the line Re(c) = 1/2, i.e. what most think and hope are the Zeros of the Zeta Function... honestly, I'm still investigating whether this is True... I'm pretty sure that either the Sum of 0s divided by the number of Zeros Summed = 1/2 as i o-o, or they are all 1/2. Curiously, for the purposes I like to use this Science for, it wouldn't matter one jot which was True... So far anyway...]
So, if you'll exuse my digression, let's get back to measures of information. So I would propose the following definition of "rate of information": number of discrete pieces of information per output, with output defined per computer program. Let's take an example of Video playing software, and assuming so sound, say it out puts a grey scale image of 1024 x 1024 pixels every 100 milliseconds. Then assuming 1 byte per pixel, the program outputs 1 Megabyte memory per 100 milliseonds. So how much Discrete Information is it outputting per 100 milliseconds? Most people would say 1 Megabyte... How about per second? Again, most people would say 10 Megabytes. Here is how I would analyse the situation. I might say that a Megabyte, in a particular state, would constitute 1 Discrete piece of information (though not the only way of looking at it). Then I might day that the Potential Discrete Information of that Megabyte was 1024 * 1024 Discrete Pieces of information. So I would say the program is outputting at 10 Discrete Pieces of Information per Second- of course this doesn't consider Container Size of the Information. Let's look at it under a different lense, why would I consider 1 Megabyte in a particular state, a single piece of information? We could just as easily see it as 1024 * 1024 Discrete Pieces of Information if we consider the value of each pixel (byte) as a single piece of Information. Finally, I could consider it as 1024 *1024 * 256 Discrete Pieces of Information if we consider each bit individually. Here's a useful Equivolance Relationship:
Assume that the number of bits in a Sub-Container is a Power of 2 and the number of bits in a Container is a larger power of 2.
letting:
S = the Sub-Contain's Potential Discrete Information
C = the Container's Potential Discrete Information
s = number of bits in the Sub-Container
c = number of bits in the Container
then:
S / 2c = 2s / C
This is nothing to Computer Scientists, as Potential Discrete Information is what they usually consider. The above Relation is just a need formalization relating the number of bits and Potential Information in a Storage Container with a Sub-Container. Such as Total RAM to words or words to bytes etc.
Now what if we relate this to Discrete Pieces of information. Considering the situation, it seems that a single output should generally be considered a single Discrete Piece of Information. Then the goal of reducing the memory foot-print of Software Might be to make a Single Piece of Discrete Information have as little Potential Information as possible. How about an example: Consider out video game Tech Demo again, where we considered a single frame to be a single output and found that a single frame had 1 Megabyte of Potential Information. So by standard Information flow calculations, we are outputting information at 10 Megabytes per Second (One frame every 100 milliseconds). Now let's consider another situation, suppose we could stream a the output data to the screen without storing the whole frame. Let's say we could output it in 10 kilobyte chunks every 1 millisecond. Then our rate of information flow hasn't changed, however out memory footprint has reduced 100 fold. I'm still a little Wooly on the notion of an output, but it would now seem sensible to model an output as one of these 10 kilobyte chunks and therefore a discrete piece of information as a single output. So what do we have now:
1000 Discrete Pieces of Information per second 1 kilobyte of Potential Information per Discrete Piece of Information Therefore: 1 Megabyte of Potetial Discrete Pieces of Information per Second...
thus: Speed = pdi di/s
i.e Data Rate = Potential Discrete Pieces of Information per Discrete Piece of Information Per Second
So we may consider di/s purely a measure of speed of data trasfer, without considering size... e.g.
30 or 60 di/s for a 60 frames per second game for example, (treating each frame as 1 discrete piece of information). Then if it is outputting on 1024x1024 screen with 4 bytes per pixel, then we could say the Output Rate of the Game is:
Output Rate = 4Mb * 60 di/s or
Output Rate = 4Mb * 30 di/s
In visual Programs such as Graphical Programs, the di/s is VERY slow in comparison to a CPUs clock speed as humans rarely perceive quality improvements in animation about about 60fps (don't believe anyone who tell you that it's 30fps!).
Now consider the Polar Opposite in Modern Day Computing, a program than generates audio. an audio output device may ouput at 44,100 frames per second (for CD Quality) and the frames will usually be 16 bits for this kind of audio. So, such a pieces of Hardware/Software has the following output rate:
Output Rate = 16bits * 44,100 di/s
So some tell me, what is the Theoretical Minimum Memory footprint for such devices? The Theoretical Minimum is to create a program who's memory footprint is less that or equal to the Potetial Discrete Information Per frame. That doesn't help you with how to achieve this, but you certainly could not beat that minimum. I'm in the process of designing programs that can do this kind of this using the Tick operation.
Now, what's the minimum Discrete Pieces of Information per frame. The Answer is actually very Surpising, even for interesting programs. The answer is 1 bit. Let me explain. EVERY output of a Computer is Analog bar none. Very obviously so in Audio Devices and and old Televisions, but even Digital Information transfer is a Wave that is interpreted Digitally. Now how many bits does it take to produce a Wave? Well let's say I flick a bit at 500Hz and output it down a cable and send it into an Amp. Then I've just created a 500Hz Square Wave and I didn't need any software to Store anything, interpret what was stored, convert to packets, decode and send to the audio device. I wont speak much more about this now because I lack the Language of an Electrical EngineeEnergy Scientist to Describe my supositions, but one thing I do know, from an information persective, is that you can generate a Vast Quantity of Waves simply by flicking a single bit with the correct timing and sequence. Finally, when it gets to the point of directly outputting an Analog Signal direct from Code, what does this Discrete Pieces of Information per Second thing mean that I'd talking about earlier? You might say that the speed was the rate at which we flicked the bit, which is probably reasonable, but by the same token, the output itself does not have a discrete quality if it is a smooth Wave...
Here's the idea... you know those ugly annoying Computer Noises that sometimes leak from Speakers, like the Insidious Machinations of some Digital Monster? That is the Amplified noise of a Computer's Brain Pattern. We send that brain Data, our Digital Firend Mulls it over using His/Her Digital Brain Wave, then sends us back data. My thinking is to try to manipulate the Computer's Brain Waves Directly, then Amplify the result to use for whatever purposes...
Finally, what happens if you amplify the signal of [a] bit[s] ‘ticking itself in an O-Cycle? That’s kind of where I’m going with this...
...hmmm... Mysterious...
Nishikala
submitted by PotentiallyNishikala to mathematics [link] [comments]

7 Days Left Until the Great Bitcoin Halving: Hashrate Jumps Over 140 Exahash, Miner's Hoard

7 Days Left Until the Great Bitcoin Halving: Hashrate Jumps Over 140 Exahash, Miner's Hoard submitted by JonyRotten to btc [link] [comments]

The Arrival of Hashrate Futures: A New hedging product for Bitcoin miners

The Arrival of Hashrate Futures: A New hedging product for Bitcoin miners submitted by qbisq to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Cash Lost 66% Of Its Hashrate, Bitcoin SV Miners Leaving Too

Bitcoin Cash Lost 66% Of Its Hashrate, Bitcoin SV Miners Leaving Too submitted by bitcointothemoon_ to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition | Mining Bitcoin News

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition | Mining Bitcoin News submitted by TeslaWatt to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Goes Up Despite Halving, Miners are Resilient

Bitcoin Hashrate Goes Up Despite Halving, Miners are Resilient submitted by raaner12 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition submitted by magic889 to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition

Bitcoin Hashrate Spikes to 120 Exahash: Difficulty Drops Allowing Miners to Rejoin the Competition submitted by Ranzware to BitNewsLive [link] [comments]

Bitcoin lite coin miner approx 700 hash rate for sale 5 Settings For Mining Cryptocurrency On Windows 10 - YouTube S9 Bitcoin Miner Overclock Hash Rate / Temps / Watts - YouTube Red Panda Mining - YouTube How to use Bitcoin Miner Whatsminer M3 Hash Rate 11.5TH/S - Tutorial

3. Antminer T9. Hier kommt ein weiterer Bitcoin Miner, der etwas teurer als der Bitmain Antminer S9 ist, aber auch seine Vorteile hat. Der T9 stellt eine Hashrate von ca. 12,5 TH pro Sekunde bei einer Netzspannung von 1450 Watt, was ihn etwas leistungsschwächer als den S9 macht. Bitcoin Mining Rigs Struggle for Profits, Despite BTC's Hashrate Reaching an All-Time High MINING Oct 15, 2020 Bitcoin Miner Marathon Agrees to Deal That Cuts Electricity Costs by 38% With US ... What is bitcoin hash rate? Hash rate is a term that describes the performance of a miner.If you want to work in the field of digital currency extraction, you need to understand the concept of hash rate. This article will be discussed in more detail in the rest of this article. Bitcoin Hashrate All Time High Bitcoin Hashrate on Oct 14, 2020 at block 652,653 181.26 EH/s How to Calculate Bitcoin Hashrate. The Bitcoin hashrate is calculated using the current Bitcoin difficulty, the defined Bitcoin block time, and the average block time of the last (X) number of blocks. Warum eine hohe Hashrate wichtig ist . Unter Berücksichtigung der anpassbaren Schwierigkeitsstufe und Zeit beim Mining, stellt sich natürlich die Frage, warum Miner auf eine hohe Hash-Power abzielen und sich gar Pools aus etlichen leistungsstarker Rechner bilden sollten.Mit Blick auf die Eigenschaften der Hash-Power wird die Antwort schnell klar: ein hoher Hash-Wert ermöglicht mehr ...

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Bitcoin lite coin miner approx 700 hash rate for sale

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